Weight Report and Some thoughts on Depression

IMG_20150913_070233When I returned to my program, on September 6, 2015, my weight had gone back up to about 278 lbs. (about a 23 lb. increase, with most of it after rotator cuff surgery). I remember it being within a pound or so of that, but didn’t take a photo. Part of the reason for not taking a picture is that I wanted to get back into fat burn and properly hydrated before reporting my weight. The reason for waiting until properly hydrated over several days is because (as I reported in the past) my weight will differ by as much as 5-7 lbs. Inflammation, as joints and organs hold water to maintain proper function adds weight. There is also the additional weight of a full bowel—sorry to share that.

This past Sunday (September 13) I weighed in at 266.8 lbs. This might seem like a large drop for just one week—which it is—except that it likely includes additional loss for the above reasons. However, I usually lose very fast on this program, at least for the first few months. After several months my metabolism will slow down to compensate for the long term calorie count. But in the first few months my body happily burns major fat.

A couple days in, I stopped feeling any hunger pains. There was the occasional grumbling tummy, but that will come and go any time. After three days, I was in fat burn and my energy levels were back up. My motivation is high and I am very pleased with the program. This actually brought up some thoughts about another time I tried to go back on program.

Last spring, for various reasons I decided to go back on program and, a week or so in, I became terribly depressed. It really came on suddenly. It was also quite extreme. That is one of the reasons I dropped off the radar blog-wise. It got bad enough, that I thought I might need to seek help. I’ve used traditional and over the counter methods for years to counteract depression, and they usually work very well (I’ll share some later). This past spring nothing seemed to work, except for dropping off of program. Even that only brought me out of “the deep dark”, into the “not as deep and dark.” I was still fairly depressed. There was an element of it that continued until recently. This helped me to figure out what happened.

Low Carb diets can affect our serotonin levels and cause lowered moods—and for some even a depressive mood.  I don’t want to say it can cause depression, because depression is something medical. If you suspect depression, see the doctor. I can talk about moods and recommend ways to improve those, but really am not offering advice on depression. I am only offering what I have learned about myself. Please take it in that spirit.

I went back on program right about the same time that there were some new stresses in my professional and personal life. Those stresses and the program joined up with it being the time my doctor lowered my testosterone dose by a third to see if my body would make up for it. It didn’t. Instead I got very low on T-level, and only recently found that out by my latest blood tests (I’ll share some of what I’ve learned about testosterone later). The doctor recently raised my dose back up and confirmed this as the cause of my symptoms.

One problem with health, and trying to return from an unhealthy state, is that there are so many different factors. One thing good for you can actually compound with something else. These together can have an undesirable effect. Throw in three or four changes together and your world can seem to come apart. Take things slow. Don’t try to improve everything at once. We want everything to be undone immediately and to return right away to that healthy young man or woman we once were. The thing is, I didn’t get to be over 400 lbs. with all the health issues I had overnight. It took decades to get there. I hope it doesn’t take decades to fix it—especially since I am not so sure how many decades I have left. The thing to remember is that my goal may be total health. But that is long term goal over the distant horizon. My goal today is to be healthier than I was yesterday; healthier than I was last week; healthier than I was last month; healthier than I was last year…

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Renewed Determination

The five months since my last post have been full, interesting and educational—and some of it depressing. You may have noticed that I dropped off the radar, blog wise. Actually, I’ve had many things going on and several reasons for not posting on this site. Well, I’m back. I have a specific reason for coming back. One thing important is that I’ve learned much about maintaining weight and the difficulties of going from unhealthy to healthy.

In April, I dropped off of program. It wasn’t intentional. My first plan was to lose the weight, which I did pretty well through Medifast. I lost the weight quickly and learned a great deal about myself. Then I switched, in the fall, to lifting weights to build muscle mass—to continue the weight loss from the other direction, gaining muscle to increase fitness and metabolism.

My job changed in ways that made it difficult to get to the gym regularly. This was more of an excuse. Had I truly wanted to make it, I could have. Of course, there were two reasons for not wanting to make it to the gym. One was an issue with my testosterone level (which I’ll address further down page) and the other was arm pain—not only when lifting, but constantly. Having spent several years in the military, my instinct was to just work through it. This had worked in many other situations. But, no matter what I did the arm only deteriorated.

So, I thought if I laid off a few weeks my arm would get better and I could just go back to it. Instead, I discovered that it didn’t get any better—it continued to get worse. During this time I lost the habit of going to the gym. A good habit must be reinforced just as strongly as a bad habit must be resisted. If you don’t go, you develop the habit of not going.

In June, I received confirmation of what I suspected. I had a torn rotator cuff. I had learned a lesson too late. That lesson was to always always always (perhaps I should say ‘always’ a few more times) lift with proper form. If you’re not going to take the time to learn and use proper form, then don’t lift! On June 23rd, I had corrective surgery to fix the rotator cuff and remove a bone spur from my shoulder. I have been in recovery since hen—I suppose physical therapy is a form of gym, right? It really stinks going from lifting weights in the quest to build muscle to working with pulleys and bands trying to regain the ability to raise my arm above my waist. If you haven’t had rotator cuff surgery, please take it off your bucket list. I assure you it isn’t fun.

During the first few months, even without the gym, I maintained my weight with little effort. Some habits were easy. I still avoid most sugars. I try to limit carbs on most days, but allow myself splurge days. I also avoided those foods which are simply not good for maintaining health (notice the past tense in that sentence). This will bring up another lesson learned, later.

I kept telling myself I was going to go back on program later and I’d go back to the gym as soon as my arm was good enough. This morning (Sunday, Sept 6, 2015), because of how my shirt no longer fit, I said to my wife, “That’s it! I’m back on program right this minute!” I went in and ordered more supplies and notified my coach. Fortunately, I have enough Medifast supplies stored to tide me over until the new shipment comes.

The issue of my testosterone was less of a lesson and more of a discovery. Early in the year my endocrinologist tried lowering my testosterone lower than ever. I was doing well, with lots of energy and motivation. This all changed with the new dosage. It took me several weeks to put the lower dose and my newly acquired lack of energy and motivation together. Then it was a couple months until my next round of tests. A couple weeks ago my doctor found that my low levels matched my symptoms and raised my dosage back up to the higher level. We did an MRI to see if there was a pituitary tumor causing problems. This showed my pituitary gland is fine. The doctor and I agree that the problem is that I still have too much body fat (more on this and testosterone in a later post). I should have continued with the Medifast to continue reducing fat and waited to start weight training. Lessoned learned.

Now with my T levels adjusted and my renewed intent, it’s time to get going back on the path of healthy choices. An important part of this will be this blog. The blog gave me accountability. When facing decisions, it helps to consider what I’ll report in this blog—good news, bad news, success or failure.

If you have dropped off your program of health, get back on program. Don’t let anything keep you from it. “When it comes to health, tomorrow never comes and later is a lie.”

Ending the Year, Continuing the Journey

Before

Before the Journey

Well, it’s been a while since I posted anything on this site. That is my oversight, as I have been very busy with changes at work, and with some new projects in the works. This week is the end of my annual goal of making healthier choices. I’ve had many victories, some failures, and quite a few lessons learned.

I thought I would post the changes that have happened. I am also going to come back to discipline myself to post about lessons learned. This post will concentrate on the changes. Future posts will concentrate on the lessons learned—those learned in the past, or new ones as they are learned.

My weight is the biggest change—but not the most significant. My lifetime high was 425 lbs. Of course, I’m not sure if that is the actual highest. That was my weight when visiting my sleep specialist for the first time. He was the only one of my doctors with a scale high enough to measure me. It was still several months of bad eating, and poor choices after that visit before I actually did anything to change, so I may have weighed much higher.

After

After a year on the journey

My first step was going on meds for my pre-diabetes under doctor’s orders. Supposedly this medicine would also cause weightloss. I started taking it, almost expecting a magic bullet effect—“Take this daily shot and get healthy and skinny.” Of course, there is no magic bullet. I lost weight down to about 385 lbs. but stopped there. Nothing else happened. I knew 385 was not really healthier than 425, so I resolved it was time to rethink my whole outlook on food, exercise, health, etc.

The rest of my journey is described elsewhere on this site, so I’ll skip to today. Starting at 385, I am now down to 258 lbs. today. My clothes are very different. I was wearing size 56 pants at my largest. I just bought my first pair of 36 waist jeans today. My shirts were 5X a year ago. Today they are XL.

The C-pap is gone. I sleep unassisted and, according to my wife, don’t even snore. I am no longer pre-diabetes. As a matter of fact, my doctor has described my A1C, cholesterol and heart rate as ideal. I now take only one pill a day for blood pressure—but we have not fully dialed in the dose yet, so this might change. My back problems have all but disappeared.

I am anxious to see my blood work this coming Wednesday. I was on Testosterone for so long that my doctor says my Pituitary became virtually non-responsive. She lowered my dose to see if my body starts creating hormones again. I pray my pituitary kicks in and I can stop taking the shots.

In the coming posts I’ll describe the lessons learned and what I plan to do for the future.

New Doctor and Med Changes

Visiting the doctor is very different from what it was a year ago. It used to be that the doctor would look at his chart, look at me, look back at the chart, shake his head and mumble before beginning the lecture of how I was shortening my life and how badly I needed to lose weight. It was always the same. Today, I had to see the doctor to get some meds refilled. Because of insurance changes I was changing doctors so this was a new one. As part of getting my medical history, it was necessary to walk her through everything that has happened over the last few years and the changes that have occurred during within the last ten months. I just love the shocked look on people’s faces when I show them the photo on my license which was taken when I was still over 400 lbs.

The interesting thing was when we went through the usual questions about current condition. My A1C and cholesterol are fine. I am off my C-PAP. I went off of one blood pressure medicine months ago. My testosterone shot volume has been reduced. I am lighter, healthier, and much more energetic. All these are things I’ve shared here before. I haven’t even had a gout flare in a couple months. During the conversation, the doctor asked if I have any medical complaints I needed to talk to her about. This was the first time that I had to think for quite a while to come up with something. I finally remembered the pain in my elbow from lifting, and she recommended an over-the-counter cream—I just used it and it worked wonders. There was really nothing else to discuss but the changes she was making to my final blood pressure medicine—my blood pressure had dropped lower than it should, showing I was now overmedicated.

I’ve been on Lisinopril for years. My dosage kept creeping up until they added HCTZ to it. Then they doubled my intake to twice a day. About a year before starting my health journey, the doctor added Amlodipine once a day, trying to keep me from stroking-out. Then came the change—no, not menopause. I started my health changes and after a few months the doctor dropped the Amlodipine. Today, my new doctor removed the HCTZ and cut my Lisinopril dosage by twenty-five percent.

I don’t remember doctor visits ever being so fun. We talked and I shared what I’ve experienced and learned over the last few months. I also shared the way my life has changed from losing the weight. The doctor paid me two great compliments—I could get used to this. She said I should hang around and talk to her other patients who just don’t seem willing to make changes. She also, when handing me the obligatory reading material, said, “Here’s some information for you to read, but based on our conversation, you could probably write it.”

It is amazing the difference in doctor visits when you take control of your own health and make positive choices. Most doctors go into medicine to help people. They can only help those who listen. They are also greatly limited when so much of our health is determined by our life choices between visits. There is no magic pill/drink/food/shot/operation going to make you healthy. The only thing that will either sustain your health or rebuild it is wise choices. These choices about what you take in (diet) and how much you burn (exercise) have to be made day by day, moment by moment. You have to develop a habit of choosing health.

Progress so far–with pictures

IMG_20150123_063350Today I return to a previous practice. I will probably only do it for a couple weeks, and then return to weight lifting, but for now I’m posting weekly weight measurements. As my readers know I switched from my previous program (Medifast with Take Shape for Life) over to carb cycling. I did this not because the prior one didn’t work. Actually, it worked miraculously and I would have happily stayed on it until at my final goal weight. However, my medical situation is such (I have been taking testosterone for years) that I wanted to attack my BMI from the lean side for a while, in order to (1) increase my metabolism and (2) increase my own output of testosterone. This required weight training, so, as I’ve reported previously, I switched over to carb cycling. For the last couple months I’ve been on a purely weight training and higher carb cycle, and decided last Friday to switch over to low carb with cardio. I’ve been back on it for a week, and today’s weight was 260 lbs.

I had changed over around 264 lbs. and started lifting. My weight over the next couple months went up to 271 lbs. (my weight last Saturday). Now, before you think this was all fat increase, and was going backwards, understand that my clothes were all starting to fit looser, and everything was getting trimmed up—except for areas I was working to enlarge. This means I was gaining muscle. Body composition and form are far more important than numbers on a scale. The scale can only tell you “how much” is there, but has no idea “what” is there. Gaining fat is bad; gaining muscle is good. However, it is inevitable that one also puts on some fat while building muscle because of the need to consume higher carbs and even some simple sugars and starches to fuel the gains.

I decided it was time to change over for a bit to give some tendons and joints a chance to heal. I had been having problems on occasion with my right wrist, right elbow, right shoulder, left hip and right ankle (Good Lord! How did I get old?). I was able to work around these when it was just one at a time, however, at my last gym session all were making it very hard to work out. I decided to give them a break and concentrate, once again, on burning fat.

An old before and after picture from several months ago.

An old before and after picture from several months ago.

me at heaviest

An old before photo of me before starting this journey.

Now, some people are going to see the number 260 lbs. and think that is still extremely fat. Remember that each person carries fat in their own way. I am not a small guy. The last time I was small was sixth grade, when I had a huge growth spirt and became head and shoulders taller than the guys who had picked on me the year before—a nice turn of the tables. Keep in mind that I came from 425 lbs. lifetime highest, and was 385 lbs. just last Easter (nine months ago). I’ve lost 165 lbs. from my highest and, of that, 125 lbs. was lost in the aforementioned nine month period. I am going to post some pictures to show what I look like now in comparison to before. Understand that I have few pictures from before because I hated taking them. Also forgive me for some of the pictures. I have my shirt off in the latest. While I know in our culture it is acceptable for a man to go shirtless, there are three reasons I am very uncomfortable with it. My wife’s culture and that of many of my friends do not view this the same way. My wife will be very embarrassed by the photo because her family can see them and in her mind they are shameful. Also, I am a pastor, and many will see such displays by one in my position as out of place. I apologize—I assure you, God’s not shamed by this display. The third reason I am so uncomfortable, is that I am not a young man. I am almost fifty and when older men want to show themselves without a shirt on the internet the best answer is “Just say no,” (Geraldo Rivera, for example). The pictures are not meant to show off. They are meant only to show my current condition—to show progress. Wearing a shirt covers many details. Please excuse them. Think of them as medical images only. (I removed one).

So, I’ve dropped from 271 lbs. to 260 lbs. in a week. Keep in mind that only part of this is fat. A great deal will be from a loss of weight lifting inflammation and from reduction in muscle glycogen stores from being low carb.

Starting to see some abs.

Starting to see some abs.

Changing it up a bit–back to fat burning!

I’ve been debating over the last few weeks the best time to lay off the weights and go into a high cardio, low carb cycle—known as a micro-cycle. In carb-cycling you go back and forth between building muscle and burning fat. The two processes are dependent on different hormones and require different fuels and different amounts of consumption.

A micro-cycle involves a catabolic state. In this state the body is breaking tissue down into components—it breaks down fat if fueled and worked properly, but if not managed well will also break down muscle and other tissue. In this state you eat low carbs, do cardio exercises and maintain a calorie deficit (eating fewer calories than you actually burn) so your body burns fat stores.

A macro-cycle involves an anabolic state. In this state the body assembles components into tissue—building muscle and other tissues. It requires higher carbs—including some simple carbs—as well as a calorie surplus (eating more calories each day than your body actually uses). The problem is that anabolism will also deposit a certain amount of fat on the body. So, one rotates between the two states to keep down the fat while increasing lean muscle mass.

For the first few months I went back and forth doing a macro-cycle on Monday, Wednesday and Friday with weight training; and a micro-cycle on Tuesday and Thursday accompanied by cardio. I saw improvements to my core and some increases in muscle mass, with no actual increase of the scale. Then about a month ago, I switched to a purely macro-cycle (weight training and higher consumption). I did about an average of 6 hours a week in the gym on weights and core training with no cardio. This brought my weight up about five pounds over where it was, but I have also built muscle mass, especially in areas I had emphasized—chest, arms, shoulders and back. I also tightened up my legs, glutes and abs.

There have been problems. At one point I over did it on my lower back and had to work around that for a while. Now I am having some problems with tendons in my right ankle and right elbow as well as something hurting from time to time in my right shoulder. I have been working around these when needed, but have for a while thought it might be time to drop off weights back to burning fat to get closer to my final goal weight before Easter (2015)—my original target date. This will also have the benefit of allowing these hurting areas to mend for a while.

The other day I decided to finish out the month of January on a micro-cycle to burn fat. As I remove some more fat from my frame, I should get a better idea of just where I need to concentrate my efforts. This means I am back in a low carb cycle and going to replace weights with cardio (rotating between bicycle, treadmill and pool workouts). I’ll switch my five days of weights for five days of cardio (Saturday and Sunday will still be rest days. At the end of January I’ll decide whether to go back to the weights or continue in a fat burning stage (I will still have some weight to lose at that time).

Last Friday (today is Monday) I made this choice and finished out my final higher-carb, weight training day. Because I’ve been on this journey for just under a year, I wanted to test and see how quickly my body would switch back into fat burning mode–having been out of it for over a month. On Friday night, I allowed myself to go wild with carbs and calories. My wife and I went to see a movie and we shared a large tub of popcorn (to be honest my wife had some and I had the rest). We followed that with supper at Fuddruckers. I had fries, and a half pound burger (yes, I ate the bun) with cheese, mushrooms, and bacon (Mmmm! Bacon!). I also ate most of my wife’s fries (I love that woman)…in the name of research, of course. Those of you who’ve read my blog know I’ve discussed the importance of making eating choices before entering the restaurant. I did this on this trip as well. I went in intent on loading down with calories and carbs to see how quickly a low carb regimen would put me back into a catabolic fat burning state—without exercise over the weekend. The next morning I started a strict low carb eating pattern. By that evening, I was already registering mild fat burn on my Ketostix. I’ve monitored since and continue in that state.

I intend to stay in low carb to burn fat for the next two weeks. My plan is, as I said, to do daily cardio during the week (Saturday is for rest and recreation while, as a pastor, Sunday is a very busy work day). However, I don’t want to lose any muscle or reduce my newly developed core strength in any way so I intend to continue hitting certain muscle groups from time to time and doing regular kettlebell routines.

This means I’ll be back to posting weekly weight reports this coming Friday. I look forward to seeing what happens and where I end up. Saturday morning when I weighed, the scale registered 271 lbs. So I still need to lose about 40 lbs. to reach my personal goal.

Latest trip to the doctor

Yesterday (January 15, 2015), I saw my endocrinologist for the first time in four months. It was an interesting consultation because rather than see the one I’ve been with for two years the clinic put me with a new doctor. Since I wanted the doctor to have a full view of where I’ve come from (and because I know doctors are often too busy to read a new patient’s entire chart) I laid out my weight and condition a year ago so she would have a proper perspective on my condition today. She found it hard to believe that I had ever been 425 lbs. I did this partly because I was a bit worried about the blood results since I have had to change my diet so much from where I was several months ago.

You see, when I was doing the Medifast program through Take Shape for Life the diet was very low carb, low fat, high protein, and nutrient rich. I was easy to maintain this because the prepared foods conveniently provided all but one meal a day. However, since dropping off the program in September and switching to carb-cycling it has not been so easy. But, my emphasis was different so I had to switch.

When I first started, I was in terrible shape. I’m talking about even after I lost the weight. No part of the previous program included conditioning. But that is to be expected. I needed to lose weight far more than I needed to get in shape. Besides, I was in bad enough shape that any attempt to exercise before losing the weight would have just caused injury (425 lbs. is a lot of weight for your body to move—or stop, once it starts moving). Because of this, while on Medifast, I did little or nothing to build muscle, but only concentrated on burning fat.

After getting my weight down to a place where I could exercise without injury, I was still very out of shape and decided to slowly start changing that. For a couple months I rotated weight machines with cardio, doing higher carb on weight days and lower carb on cardio days. My cardio day was usually either an hour on the treadmill or 45 minutes in the pool. My weight days included doing a full spectrum of weight resistance machines so every major muscle group was hit each time. As my weight kept lowering and everything began tightening and toning, I started adding in some free weights.

After a couple months of toning and tightening, I decided it was time to start building lean muscle to attack my body’s BMI from the lean side. This would increase testosterone, raise my metabolism, and in this way burn fat faster when I returned to cardio and fat burning later. I have spent the last couple months doing a hard regiment of weights to build muscle. I’m in the gym five days a week. Saturday and Sunday are rest days for my body, because it is when you are at rest that your body repairs and builds muscle. Overworking causes problems as your body releases cortisol which will undo what you work hard to build. Tuesday and Thursday are leg days. Since these days are very hard on my back because it includes squats and stiff-legged deadlifts, I only go for about 45 minutes or so. Besides, the weights being moved on those days are much higher than on upper body days. I also do kettlebell goblet squats and kettlebell Turkish get-ups on those days to strengthen form and to build core. Monday, Wednesday and Friday I hit upper body (arms, shoulders, back, etc.). I have really been hitting shoulders, back and biceps hardest. This day is all free weights, along with kettlebell swings, and kettlebell snatch. Upper body days are 1 ½ hours in the gym—except on Friday which I hit extra hard so it gets close to 2 hours. I really want to deplete my muscle glycogen reserves before going into the weekend, and also give my muscles lots to repair. Besides, this makes it possible for my wife and I to go out or do something special on Friday, if we choose. If I’ve really thrashed my muscles, I may move slowly but I don’t have to be as careful about what I eat on dates with my wife because high carbs and even simple sugars will largely be gobbled right up replenishing muscle glycogen stores—at least much of it will.

This liberty on carbs was a bit of a hard learned lesson. I had such good results on low-carb and have had such a history of carb addiction and its related problems that I had developed a carb phobia. Unfortunately, when building muscle one the primary fuel is carbs. Because of my fear of carbs I tried staying “lower carb” without any simple sugars or starches while trying to build muscle. I was getting very minimal results. Once I learned the lesson about this I started cranking up the carb intake as an experiment. I did some study and tried hard to get most of my carbs from foods with a lower glycemic index and a lower glycemic load to regulate insulin. This too can go too far, because I learned that along with testosterone and human growth hormone, there is one other essential ingredient needed by your body to build muscle—insulin. It is insulin that tells your body whether to convert carbs into fat for later use or to push them into your muscles as glycogen. This means I had to actually undo habits I had developed over months and allow myself foods higher in sugars and carbs. Of course, it’s best to go with foods that are metabolized slowly to cause a more gradual and manageable uptick in insulin secretion rather than super simple sugars that will cause a major dump of insulin along with the sugar crash afterwards and trigger the cycle of carb craving.

It was this new addition to my diet that I found the most frightening as I waited in the doctor’s office wondering about my lab results. So, what were the results? Well, I’ve been on testosterone for over two years because my weight and sleep apnea trashed my endocrine system. Now, after losing the weight I can sleep without the C-PAP, and last visit the doctor decided to try lowering my testosterone injections. Now, the doctor has decided to try weaning me off of it, so it was reduced even further. We have to go slow, because my pituitary gland has become totally non-responsive because I was bringing in the testosterone from outside and it had no need to order my body to make it. Now, we have to slowly reduce it, and hopefully the pituitary will return to functioning normally—we find out in my next visit three months from now. I was pretty sure my T levels were getting better—and so was my wife—so there was no fear here.

My fear was about what my A1C would look like. When I started this quest for health, I was pre-diabetic. My doctor had warned me I was just a hairs breath from going into full blown diabetes, and would someday be insulin dependent if I didn’t make a change. My family has quite a history with diabetes and heart disease so I knew what these would entail. I wanted nothing to do with them. I feared that my higher carb consumption had brought this number back into bad territory. My prior time with the doctor showed me to be out of danger for diabetes. My latest numbers show my A1C unchanged—even with the higher carb intake. In her words, “You are in no danger of diabetes; your diet is right where it should be.” This was good to hear. I don’t think I’ve ever heard more beautiful words spoken by a doctor.

I still have things to work on. My plan is to switch from weights to cardio with low carb to move from an anabolic (muscle building) to a catabolic (fat burning) state and burn off the rest of my excess fat. I know I need to do it, but a couple things make me wary. One, I don’t want to lose any of the muscle that I’ve built. Two, I’ve developed an iron addiction—I absolutely love lifting weights! People told me that if I ever started working out I’d get addicted. I always told them they were high, because I hated working out, and had tried over and over but never enjoyed it. The secret was first losing the weight. Now I look forward to getting to the gym each day. If my day is busy enough to keep me from the gym I get very irritable. Often I’ll run into the house from my last appointment or meeting, quickly changed just to run back out the door to get to the gym. I even carry my weight belt, gloves and straps in the car, and if wearing workout pants and sweatshirt is appropriate, I’ll just dress for the gym all day and run straight there after any appointments. One day, my daughter said, “Oh my Gosh, Dad! You’re turning into one of ‘those guys’ at the gym.” Funny thing is she’s right.

Lose the weight! Start now! Forget about just making another New Year resolution to be abandoned at the first offer of a brownie or the first sight of a candy bar in the checkout line. Get into a program that works! But don’t just approach it as “a program” for now. It has to be a life change. Think of it as making a change for life, because if you are heavy and unhealthy as I was that is the only way to actually have a life.